markcoatney:

RIP, NYT Chess. We’ll always have Bangkok.

This is terrible news — I’m trying to make it to Elo 1300 — and I had to learn it from ABBA?

jellobiafrasays:

pamphlets from the understanding the atom series (1964-1968 eds.)

(via popmech)

Is it still an earwig if it’s a Kate Bush song?

putthison:

The Fashion of No Fashion
The New York Times on whether Tim Cook — now a leader in wearable technology — should tuck in his shirt:

Is it time for Tim Cook to tuck in his shirt? Every time I see the Apple chief executive take the stage, as he probably will on Thursday at yet another exciting new product introduction, I can’t help wondering.
Much has been made, after all, of Apple’s recent cozying up to the fashion world: its supersecret unveiling of its watch to a few carefully chosen magazine editors last month; said watch’s introduction during New York Fashion Week; the pop-up display and dinners held in its honor during Paris Fashion Week; and its starring appearance on the cover of China Vogue’s November issue, attractively accessorized with a Céline dress and the model Liu Wen.
But as we enter the age of the wearable, might it not behoove the leader of such a brand to look the part? This is not a flippant question.
It is true that Mr. Cook does seem to have developed a signature personal style in the spirit of his predecessor, Steve Jobs, who wore a jeans-and-black-mock-turtleneck combo pretty much every time he appeared in public. To wit: a large, slightly wrinkled, untucked button-down shirt. Though the color may change (the shirt has appeared in varying shades of black, blue and even lavender), the form remains the same.
But unlike Mr. Jobs, whose look referenced a specific design language (Issey Miyake cool), Mr. Cook has a style that is more like the fashion of no fashion, to borrow an idea from George W. S. Trow. For a company that clearly wants to influence fashion, that is a confusing message to send.

You can read the rest here.

Could not read this without thinking of this Onion piece: 
New Study Finds Link Between Breastfeeding, Always Knowing What’s Right For Everyone
It’s notable that she thinks Cook should dress up because the Apple watch is a fashion product and not, say, a useful tool (the main basis on which I’d judge it). But particularly irritating is the gratuitous mention of George Trow, whose ponderous solipsistic book I’m pretty sure she hasn’t read beyond the catchy title. Cook’s fashion choices have a context (as do everyone’s); that you don’t share it doesn’t make them bad choices.

putthison:

The Fashion of No Fashion

The New York Times on whether Tim Cook — now a leader in wearable technology — should tuck in his shirt:

Is it time for Tim Cook to tuck in his shirt? Every time I see the Apple chief executive take the stage, as he probably will on Thursday at yet another exciting new product introduction, I can’t help wondering.

Much has been made, after all, of Apple’s recent cozying up to the fashion world: its supersecret unveiling of its watch to a few carefully chosen magazine editors last month; said watch’s introduction during New York Fashion Week; the pop-up display and dinners held in its honor during Paris Fashion Week; and its starring appearance on the cover of China Vogue’s November issue, attractively accessorized with a Céline dress and the model Liu Wen.

But as we enter the age of the wearable, might it not behoove the leader of such a brand to look the part? This is not a flippant question.

It is true that Mr. Cook does seem to have developed a signature personal style in the spirit of his predecessor, Steve Jobs, who wore a jeans-and-black-mock-turtleneck combo pretty much every time he appeared in public. To wit: a large, slightly wrinkled, untucked button-down shirt. Though the color may change (the shirt has appeared in varying shades of black, blue and even lavender), the form remains the same.

But unlike Mr. Jobs, whose look referenced a specific design language (Issey Miyake cool), Mr. Cook has a style that is more like the fashion of no fashion, to borrow an idea from George W. S. Trow. For a company that clearly wants to influence fashion, that is a confusing message to send.

You can read the rest here.

Could not read this without thinking of this Onion piece: 

New Study Finds Link Between Breastfeeding, Always Knowing What’s Right For Everyone

It’s notable that she thinks Cook should dress up because the Apple watch is a fashion product and not, say, a useful tool (the main basis on which I’d judge it). But particularly irritating is the gratuitous mention of George Trow, whose ponderous solipsistic book I’m pretty sure she hasn’t read beyond the catchy title. Cook’s fashion choices have a context (as do everyone’s); that you don’t share it doesn’t make them bad choices.

imperiovida:

Helloooooooo #perfect #design plus excellent #photography = #art… #eames #chairs #midcenturymodern #colorblock

(via eameswelike)

thehipperelement:

Black Swan: Could this type of thinking improve how you design solutions?

Palisades Ave., Jersey City

How to Take Your Pet Everywhere

newyorker:

image

In this week’s issue, Patricia Marx reports on touring New York and Boston with five “un-cuddly” emotional-support animals

"Why did the turkey cross the road? To get to the Hampton Jitney. How did the twenty-six-pound fowl get across? With me hoisting him by his ‘Emotional Support Animal’ harness, as if he were a duffel bag."

Above: The author takes an alpaca to the drugstore. Photograph by Robin Siegel.