bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.
Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.
A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.

Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.

A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

theavc:

Smarter, but at a price: 11 consequences of using 100 percent of your brain

1. You’ll get hauled into a silly, millennia-old war.

Of all the fallacies regularly perpetuated by pop culture, none are quite as narratively useful as the erroneous scientific “fact” that humans use only 10 (or 8 or 20 or anything less than 100) percent of their brains. Often, this old chestnut is employed as a casual blow-off explanation for superpowers and special abilities, a cheery hand-wave to the audience that denotes, “We don’t want to talk about this, we want to get to the action.” That’s certainly the case with this week’s Lucy, which casts Scarlett Johansson as a woman who unlocks the full potential of her mind. It also applies to the thoroughly silly 2010 Nicolas Cage film The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, which dumps Jay Baruchel into an ancient war between “Merlinian” wizards and “Morganian” wizards, each descended from their namesakes of Arthurian legend. Sorcerers don’t get a choice about having their powers—they’re just born with, as Cage says, “the capability to use the entire power of their brains” instead of the usual 10 percent. And yet Cage also claims magic is science. He says a lot of bullshit throughout the film, really, but the upshot is that nerdy Baruchel gets to save the world and get the girl, all because his brain is 10 percent normal, 90 percent full of Merlinian Chosen One status.

veryraresecrete:

XTC, “Making Plans For Nigel” from Drums and Wires (Virgin, 1979)

(via villejavat)

thehipperelement:

As I sit here writing this, I have a really bad sunburn. Looking back at my “last day of vacation” behaviour, I should have expected this. What I didn’t expect was to fix it with UX.


Day 1 and Day 2 of this sunburn were what you have all probably experienced at one time or another:

namelessin314:

United States Planes in World War II. Illus by Herbert Townsend, from America, the Story of Our Country, 1951

(via atompunk)

“Just because you feel strongly about it, doesn’t mean it matters.”
— Base feelings on importance, not vice versa. (via thehipperelement)

I grew up in the rattlesnakes and cow skulls state (AZ), but now I live in the empty red state (NJ).

(via villejavat)